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Designers

4 mins read

10 Black Designers at New York Fashion Week 2022

New York Fashion Week kicked off on Friday, Sept. 9th. The September shows are always eagerly anticipated, and after several virtual and hybrid seasons, the New York calendar is more packed than it has been in a while, with designers eager to showcase their best work and the city aiming to reclaim its position as a leader in the global fashion industry.

Reportedly, Black designers make up more than twenty-five percent of the runway shows at this year’s New York Fashion Week.

Meet some of them below.

Black Designers at NYFW 2022

June79

June79 is the new standard of menswear, reframing and redefining the new standard of luxury, existing between the fine balance of work performance and luxury leisure. June79 is founded on the premise of the new luxury renaissance, from quality and craftsmanship to mentality and style.

black designers

Junny

JUNNY is a former ESPN sales executive who discovered her passion for designing after getting downsized from her position 6 years ago. Her collections are bold, creatively exuberant, and size-inclusive, drawing on the vibrancy of her Harlem and Jamaican cultural roots. Her collections have often been described as “wearable art.”

Ashya

ASHYA’s (pronounced “agh-shya”) vision is rooted in travel, cultural awareness, and unifying style and utility. Ashley Cimone and Moya Annece developed the brand as an “ode to exploration.” They design for simple movement and essentialism, inspired by worldwide Black, Brown, and Indigenous populations and transient modern existence.

Kimberly Goldson

Kimberly Goldson is a Brooklyn-based, sister-crafted, luxury-driven contemporary womenswear brand centered around women’s suiting.

black designers

Black Boy Knits

Black Boy Knits (BBK) is an independent design studio that emphasizes Black, queer and immigrant narratives while highlighting its contributions on a global perspective. As a design studio, BBK centers on creating unique pieces on a made-to-order basis.

Marrisa Wilson

MARRISA WILSON is built around the philosophy that all women should be able to effortlessly express their unique personalities. With a focus on quality and functionality, and a colorful, optimistic aesthetic, the brand is an extension of founder and creative director Marrisa Wilson’s personal belief that high-end fashion can still be attainable and inclusive.

black designers

Studio One Eighty Nine

Studio One Eighty Nine is an artisan-focused brand based in Ghana and the United States. All Studio 189 clothing is produced in Africa in craftsmen communities that specialize in traditional textile techniques, such as hand-printing batik patterns and using plant-based dyes.

Todd Patrick

Todd Patrick is a luxury menswear brand that focuses on how the past shapes the future. The brand has carved out a niche lane for the mid-century modern man of today’s time. Each piece translates fabric to conversation.

Connor McKnight

Connor McKnight is a luxury fashion brand based in Brooklyn, NY established during the pandemic. With this collection, he explored his relationship to this practice of daily work, emphasizing craft and utility with refined timeless silhouettes to be worn for a lifetime. All designs are suggestions of ideas that we see in everyday life adjusted to create an abnormality.

Victor Glemaud

Haitian-American designer Victor Glemaud launched his eponymous designer collection of statement knitwear, designed for all people, genders, races, sizes, and personalities, marrying comfort and style.

-Tony O. Lawson

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1 min read

Black Owned Luxury Brands To Support Instead of GUCCI and Prada

Years after the Gucci and Prada debacle, apologies have been made as well as attempts to win back consumer trust. No matter the motive behind these gestures, the fact remains that there are too many Black owned luxury brands that offer great products for us to keep supporting the same brands religiously.

That being said, here is a list of Black owned luxury brands that you can use to replace the usual suspects.

#NEVERFORGET

Black Owned Luxury Brands

Wear Brims

Frances Grey

Tori Soudan

House of Takura

MIITRA

SWAV Eyewear

Linell Ellis

Undra Celeste

4th & Avery

 

Lemlem

COLD LAUNDRY

Fe Noel

Armando Cabral

Wales Bonner

ZAAF

Mifland

Andrea Iyamah

Tsemaye Binite

Ozwald Boateng

Made Leather Co.

Hanifa

Monrowe NYC

Christie Brown

Tony O. Lawson


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2 mins read

African Fashion Brands to Keep An Eye On

This month, Fashion Week events will be taking place in New York, Paris, London and Milan. Now more than ever, you can expect the presence of dope African Fashion brands or designs influenced by African culture.

Here are just a few established and up and coming fashion brands on the Continent that you should get into:

African Fashion Brands

Galago (South Africa) sources beautiful leathers and vibrant fabrics and allows you to combine them to make your own bespoke sandal.

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ENZI (Ethiopia) is a footwear brand committed to the highest levels of quality in production, design and materials while maintaining a commitment to social and environmental responsibility.

black owned

MaXhosa Knitwear (South Africa) celebrates the rich heritage of the Xhosa culture through providing traditional clothing for Xhosa initiation rituals.

shoppe black

Lukhanyo Mdingi (South Africa)aims to show a sense of cross cultural influences of traditional designs; reflecting on a contemporary outlook of African aesthetics and heritage.

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Lanre da Silva Ajayi Couture (Nigeria) creates clothing for the woman who is naturally classy but doesn’t shy away from her sensual side.

shoppe black

Loza Maléombho (Côte d’Ivoire) is a fusion between traditional cultures/ sub-cultures and contemporary fashion.

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Taibo Bacar (Mozambique) is a burst of wholesome energy for all women who identify themselves with eclectic style where the silhouette plays a central role.

Taibo Bacar

Christie Brown (Ghana) is a women’s apparel and accessories line with pieces ranging from bespoke gowns, and practical yet statement pieces to innovative accessories all inspired by African culture and art.

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Thula Sindi (South Africa) is a clothing brand that cuts across the vast discrepancy that exists between unrealistic high-end designer haute couture, and everyday retail chain/bargain bin clothing.

African Fashion Brands

 

-Tony O. Lawson

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13 mins read

20 Young African Influencers in the Diaspora

It goes without saying but i’ll say it anyway – Continental African’s get our shine on wherever we go. In almost every industry, the bylines of the world’s emerging leaders are looking like a young continental African “Who’s Who”. Here’s a look at a group of young African influencers who deserve kudos and a slow clap for their accomplishments. We see you and we’re excited about what’s to come. It is never an easy process to become an influencer in any form. Social media influencers have become very popular in recent times and the goal of many young people. The secret could be that Social media influencers buy Instagram likes at Buzzoid.

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Young African Influencers in the Diaspora

Rahiel Tesfamariam is a native of Eritrea who was raised in Washington D.C. She is a social activist, public theologian, writer and international speaker. She is the brains behind #NotOneDime a nationwide economic boycott launched in the aftermath of the Ferguson non-indictment decision. Rahiel is also the founder and publisher of Urban Cusp, a cutting-edge online lifestyle magazine highlighting progressive urban culture, faith, social change and global awareness.

Young African Influencers

Chef Rougui Dia, “The African Queen of Parisian Cuisine” was born in Paris to Senegalese parents. While serving as Executive Chef at Le 144, a restaurant affiliated with Paris’ posh art deco venue and restaurant, Petrossian, Dia became one of the most respected female chefs in France. She later presided over the kitchen at Le Vraymonde, an upscale restaurant located in Paris’ Buddha-Bar Hotel.

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Abiola Oke left the Bronx as a youngster to attend high school in Nigeria. Coming back to the States to finish high school, he did a quick stint at Howard University. Needless to say, the Mecca left an undeniable Pan-africanist mark on his consciousness and would help to influence his future career. He graduated from City College and worked for a top corporate finance firm until leaving the industry to step into the role as CEO of OKAYAFRICA. OKAYAFRICA is a media company that presents African culture to the world in a unique way, while empowering progressive artists. Abiola’s goal is to provide a platform for African artists to express their art and share it in a way that is authentic and far-reaching.

Young African Influencers

Angelica Nwandu is a Sundance Screenwriter Fellow and the creator of The Shade Room, the first blog to publish directly to Instagram. She was recently named one of Forbes 30 under 30. Since its start in early 2014, The Shade Room has grown into a lucrative enterprise. The site currently has four million followers and reportedly pulls in hundreds of thousands of followers each month.

Young African Influencers

Adewale “Wally” Adeyemoa is a Nigerian-American who grew up in Southern California. In December 2015, President Barack Obama appointed him as his Deputy National Security Adviser for International Economic Affairs. In a statement released by the White House, President Obama remarked, “I will be calling on Wally’s intellect, judgment and dedication as we sustain America’s global economic leadership, which reinforces our national security, and as we work with allies and partners around the world to create jobs and opportunity for all our people.”

Young African Influencers

Luvvie Ajayi was born in Nigeria and moved to the U.S. when she was nine. She is the creator of Awesomely Luvvie, a popular entertainment and humor blog that covers everything pop culture. Last year, she was named a 2015 Black Innovator by XFINITY Comcast. With over a decade of experience, you could say that she’s an O.G. in the blogging game. Her first book, titled, I’M JUDGING YOU: The Do Better Manual, was released in September and quickly became a New York Times bestseller.

Young African Influencers

In January 2015, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser appointed Mamadou Samba to serve as the Director of the Mayor’s Office of African Affairs. Originally from Dakar, Mamadou is passionate about addressing the challenges faced by African immigrants in the District and nationwide. He has played a significant role in securing grants for African nonprofit organizations and highlighting issues impacting African-born residents in the United States.

Young African Influencers

Nina Oduro grew up in Ghana and moved to Virginia at the age of seven, She is the founder of AfricanDevJobs.com, an online platform that connects organizations and professionals who are focused on Africa’s growth and development. Her company offers employment opportunities and career advancement resources. Nina is also the co-founder of Dine Diaspora, a lifestyle and events company that creates dynamic experiences around food, culture, and heritage.

Young African Influencers

A native of Rwanda, Jackson Mvunganyi is a Radio host and new media reporter at Voice of America. In 2007 VOA’s launched a youth-oriented talk show, Upront Africa. It became the first cross continental radio show reaching millions of students and young professionals around Africa and beyond. His more than 17,000 Twitter followers include President Obama.

Young African Influencers

Zim Ugochukwu is the Founder & CEO of Travel Noire, a digital platform that has become one of the most popular resources for Black travelers. She was recently listed on Forbes 2016 ’30 Under 30’ list as of the brightest young entrepreneurs. Thanks to Zim, it is now obvious to those that didn’t know – Black people love to get their travel on!

Young African Influencers

Rediate Tekeste is a first generation Ethiopian-American and founder of the Ethiopian Diaspora Fellowship (EDF). This Los Angeles-based fellowship program connects young Ethiopians in the diaspora with their home country and provides them with the opportunity to be part of the country’s development through practical work experience.

young african influencers

Samuel Bazawule, known by the stage name Blitz the Ambassador, is a Ghanaian-American hip-hop artist, composer, producer and visual artist based in Brooklyn. He was recently named TED Fellow, Blitz combines the political boldness of Public Enemy, and the groove sense of Fela Kuti. His label, Embassy MVMT, is proving that Hip Hop fans are tired of the same old radio playlists and are hungry for music that is more creative and thoughtful.

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Mariéme Jamme is a Senegalese-born businesswoman based in the U.K. Her company, Spotone Global Solutions helps technology companies develop business in new markets such as Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Mariéme is also an international speaker and co-founder of Africa Gathering, the first global platform bringing together entrepreneurs and others to share ideas about development in Africa. She was named by the World Economic Forum as one of its Young Global Leaders for 2013.

Young African Influencers

Ugandan fashion model, Aamito Lagum, — a former Top Model winner, is more recently known for the controversy caused by racist comments about her lips that were posted on MAC cosmetics Instagram page. Aamito boldly took to the internet in defense of her beauty, and the beauty of other women with similar features. This prompted campaigns like #PrettyLipsPeriod (created by Dr. Yaba Blay and Thembisa Mshaka) where Black women around the world unapologetically celebrate their full lips.

young african influencers

Yinka Ilori is a U.K based designer. He is passionately against the unnecessary waste he has seen in European and West African consumer cultures. His craft and vision is collecting discarded furniture, and re-upholstering and designing into something new. Yinka is inspired by the traditional Nigerian parables and African fabrics that surrounded him as child.

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Folasade Adeoso is a New York-based, Nigerian-born, model and digital artist. She’s the chief editor and writer behind the lifestyle blog, LoveFola and the owner of the online boutique, “1953 | THE COLLECTIONS”. Folasade is known for her digital collages, which mix archival and contemporary images into Dalí-esque visions.

young african influencers

Chef Djibril Bodian is a second-generation baker of Senegalese origin. Last year he won first prize in the Grand Prix de la Baguette de Tradition Française de la Ville de Paris, a.k.a. The Best Baguette in Paris Competition. Chef Djibril also won the top prize five years ago. This prestigious award allowed him to be the only baguette supplier to French President Holland at the Elysées Palace. The fame and publicity didn’t hurt his pockets either. He can be found creating baked goodness at ‘Grenier à Pain’ in Montmartre.

young african influencers

Heben Nigatu was born in Ethiopia and moved to the U.S. when she was five. The Columbia grad is a senior editor at Buzzfeed and co-host of “Another Round”, Buzzfeed’s most successful podcast. Heben was recently ranked #17 on Forbe’s 30 Under 30 in media. The podcast, (an iTunes’ podcast top 100) gets hundreds of thousands of listeners a month and touches on topics that range from race and politics to pop culture and favorite alcoholic drinks.

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Bouba Dola was born in Kinshasa, Congo. His family moved to the Netherlands when he was a child. He studied at HKU in Utrecht and has been working throughout the Netherlands, specifically between Amsterdam and Rotterdam. He focuses his creative energy on the infusion of digital art – drawings, music and videos. His collaboration with young Black Dutch hip hop artists has helped to jump start many of their careers. His sound is reminiscent of the Los Angeles music of Flying Lotus but with elements of ancient Kikongo vibrations and patterns. Currently, Bouba is working on his first cinematic work.

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Saran Kaba Jones is a clean water advocate and social entrepreneur from Liberia. She is the founder of Face Africa, a U.S.-based non-profit organization that provides access to clean drinking water in Liberia’s rural communities, where running water and sewage infrastructure is often scarce. Face Africa was launched in 2009, and has provided clean water to thousands of rural Liberians. Saran was named by the World Economic Forum as one of its Young Global Leaders for 2013.

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Tony Oluwatoyin Lawson