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Charles White Painting Missing For Decades From Howard University Turns Up At Sotheby’s

A painting by a noted artist Charles White vanished from Howard University in the 1970s and hadn’t been seen publicly until it turned up at Sotheby’s Auction House last month — and now the school is suing to get back the piece that they believe was stolen from them decades ago.

Howard University, acquired the artwork, “Centralia Madonna,” in the 1940s after its creator, Charles White, completed an artist-in-residency at the school, according to a lawsuit filed Friday in Manhattan federal court.

The ink drawing depicts an African American Madonna figure and had been in the university’s possession until at least 1974, when a graduate student viewed the work in the school’s collection and made a record of the piece, according to the suit.

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Centralia Madonna

At some point soon after, the artwork was stolen from the school’s collection and marked as “missing” by a university curator in 1976, according to the lawsuit.

Staff at the university hadn’t been able to locate it in the decades since — until Sotheby’s Auction House in Manhattan contacted them in May to let them know it had been consigned and was scheduled to be put up for auction.

Charles White in his Los Angeles studio, 1970 photo: Robert A. Nakamura

Staff at the auction house told administrators at Howard that two people from South Carolina, Larry and Virginia Borders, had consigned the painting but provided no paperwork showing how it ended up in their personal collection, according to the suit.

The Borders gave shifting stories about how they acquired the work, first saying they received it as a wedding gift from someone named J.D. Kibler in 1972, according to the suit.

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Charles White, 1943, Photograph by Gordon Parks at age 25

They allegedly changed their story, claiming Kibler gave it to them as a gift for no particular reason — but couldn’t expand on their relationship with him, or even provide his first name.

“They claimed J.D. Kibler to be a close friend, they stated that they did not know what the ‘J.D.’ stood for,” the suit states.

In several phone calls and emails this week, the university demanded the Borders return the painting to the school, which the pair refused to do, according to the lawsuit.

The university filed the suit Friday, seeking the artwork’s return and attorney fees related to the legal action. The case is Howard University v Borders, 20-cv-4716, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).

(L-R) Howard University President Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederickand Gwendolyn H. Everett, Ph.D., director of the Howard University Gallery of Art and associate dean for the Division of Fine Arts beside Five Great American Negroes, at the Howard University Law Library

The couple’s “claims are all the more implausible given that Howard University has never sold or de-accessioned any work from its collection, and would certainly not sell or de-accession a work by Charles White, a hugely significant Black artist with strong ties to the university,” Howard said in its lawsuit.

In addition to purchasing several of his works, Howard appointed White to a three-year professorship shortly before his death.

In a statement, Sotheby’s said they are a third-party and the ownership dispute involves the Borders and Howard.

“This is an ownership dispute between the University and the consignors, which follows Sotheby’s due diligence in researching the work’s provenance,” the auction house said.

“Sotheby’s is merely a third-party stakeholder and will comply with any decision of the court,” it added.

 

Sources: New York Post and Bloomberg


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2020 Howard University Graduate Earns Ph.D. at Age 73

On April 26, 2020, Florence Didigu, 73, defended her dissertation to earn her Ph.D. in Communication, Culture and Media Studies. Her dissertation and future book titled, “Igbo Collective Memory of the Nigeria – Biafra War (1967-1970): Reclaiming Forgotten Women’s Voices and Building Peace through a Gendered Lens,” is a reflection of the Igbo women who, like herself, survived the war.

Howard Grad
Florence Didigu

Didigu, who is the oldest of five sisters, is graduating from Howard University with her fourth degree as a prestigious Sasakawa and Annenberg Fellow. She is thankful to have made it across many hurdles.

“In my second year at Howard, and very close to my screening test, I lost my mother and my father within months,” said Didigu. “I had to return to Nigeria each time to perform the demanding burial ceremonies for each. I was completely deflated, both physically and emotionally, but I persevered because my father always wanted me to be a ‘Doctor.’”

Didigu also battled shingles, which paralyzed the right side of her face and she lost her voice. It was symbolic because it’s her life’s work is to elevate more Igbo women’s voices too. “I was unable to speak clearly; this was the greatest tragedy of all since I was teaching a sophomore research course! The day I started speaking again and was discharged from the hospital was a special life moment.”

Yet, what she overcame 50 years ago, the Nigerian-Biafra War, a civil war between the Igbo people and the Nigerian government, is one challenge she will never forget.

“The day the Nigeria-Biafra War ended, I, like everyone was wallowing in anxiety and fear about what would happen to us as the vanquished. A very optimistic gentleman came over to me and asked: ‘Why are you so sad; can’t you see you have survived this terrible war?’ I stood up, even though the Nigerian Airforce was on its last bombing raid, and leaped up in the air in mad glee, repeating to myself and others: ‘Yes, I have survived, I am a survivor!’ This powerful survival instinct in me, which I call daring, and God’s help, are what made me overcome all personal challenges during my doctoral program and get to where I am today!”

She was once a producer and writer at the Nigerian Television Authority (NTA), and a broadcast regulator at the National Broadcasting Commission (NBC) in Nigeria prior to 2000. Upon graduation, Didigu plans to enter the professoriate and become a book author. She recently took courses at Howard in the Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) program. She plans to continue research and scholarly writings, as well as mentoring students to inspire and educate “the future generation that will move this discipline forward and tackle the communications-oriented challenges of the future.”

Carolyn Byerly, Ph.D.,  Didigu’s advisor and chair of the Communication, Culture and Media Studies doctoral program, noticed the excellence within her, noting that “she embodies endurance and intellectual determination.”

“I admire the way she delved inside the most painful period of her life to find the focus of her research on women, war and peace.  While a personally-driven project, she maintained the highest level of integrity and never made the research outcome about herself.  Florence received the Sasakawa Peace Foundation Fellowship in her last year to conduct interviews with 10 female survivors of that war, and she used feminist standpoint theory to interpret their stories.  It is a beautifully researched, theorized and written dissertation that demonstrates exceptional Howard scholarship.”

 

Source: Howard.edu

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FAMU Secures $750,000 in Federal Scholarship Funds to Attract Students To Study Agriculture and Food Sciences

Florida A&M University’s (FAMU) College of Agriculture and Food Sciences (CAFS) received $752,632 in federal funds for scholarships to attract high achieving students.

Funding from this 1890 Scholarship Program will provide 49 new scholarships for entering freshmen to pursue and obtain their baccalaureate degrees in food and agricultural sciences from FAMU in four years, and for qualified, transfer students in two years.

“The timing of this scholarship funding could not be more opportune,” said FAMU President Larry Robinson, Ph.D. “The present circumstances reinforce the need for us to train more scholars who can make advances in issues such as food security and create other opportunities in agriculture. These funds will allow FAMU to bring much needed and diverse talent to this area of critical need for our nation.”

The funding is one of 19 awards totaling $14 million to 1890 land grant colleges, which are historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU), from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

The funding is made possible through NIFA’s 1890 Scholarships Program, authorized by the 2018 Farm Bill. FAMU alumnus U.S. Rep. David Scott, D-Ga., is credited with the scholarship appropriation’s inclusion in the legislation.

The grant program seeks to address a critical question facing the food and agricultural sciences industry, how does it attract more talented young, diverse persons into agricultural jobs, said CAFS Dean Robert Taylor.

“Indeed, this continues to be the major question that is being asked by faculty and administrators in the College of Agriculture and Food Sciences at FAMU, as it tries to respond to the low, and in some cases, declining enrollment in some of its critical academic programs,” Taylor said.

With state and federal funding for education on the decline, the student debt burden continues to be high. The overall goal of this 1890 Scholarships Program is to address that issue by providing scholarships to support the recruiting, engaging, retaining, mentoring, and training of outstanding students as they pursue baccalaureate degrees in the food and agricultural sciences in CAFS at FAMU.

Scholars will be recruited from across Florida and from neighboring states, such as Georgia and Alabama. High achieving students will be invited to apply to the FAMU 1890 Scholarship Program. In order to be selected, students must meet or exceed the stated criteria for the various scholarships advertised.

“This funding will help CAFS cultivate and graduate more diverse leaders, who will be well equipped to address and solve future emerging challenges in food and agricultural sciences,” Taylor said.

 

Source: FAMU News


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Howard University to receive $13 Million as part of Coronavirus Stimulus Package

The Senate unanimously passed an approximately $2.2 trillion stimulus package late Wednesday night in an effort to jump-start an economy severely affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

This coronavirus response package makes millions of dollars in funding available for Howard University through September 2021.

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Washington DC, Howard University campus sign. (Photo by: Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images)

The draft legislation calls for $13 million “to remain available through September 30, 2021, to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus, domestically or internationally, including to help defray the expenses directly caused by coronavirus and to enable grants to students for expenses directly related to coronavirus and the disruption of university operations.”

As you can imagine, not everyone is happy about this news. Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz took to Twitter, saying , “$13,000,000 in taxpayer funds could be going to families across the nation struggling to put food on the table in the midst of COVID-19. Instead, it’s going to Howard University. Education is important- but a $13 million check to Howard does not belong in COVID-19 relief.”

What Gaetz failed to realize is that Howard is a federally chartered university that is rightfully owed emergency funding because Congressional appropriations fund the school, which also runs Howard University Hospital, a medical facility that has been designated one of DC’s COVID-19 treatment facilities.

 

-Tony O. Lawson

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Howard University Teams With Amazon Studios To Launch Howard Entertainment

Howard University and Amazon Studios have teamed to launch Howard Entertainment, a program designed to diversify the entertainment industry by creating a pipeline for African-American students and other marginalized populations to train and study alongside entertainment executives.

Howard Entertainment

The immersive program, which kicks off January 2020, will be two semesters and take place in Los Angeles. It will include a unique interdisciplinary curriculum and will also include hands-on work as well as an opportunity to network with Amazon’s industry partners.

It will offer Howard University students the opportunity to take academic courses during the spring semester and participate in a fellowship embedded in the entertainment industry during the summer semester. The coursework will be applied to the student’s graduation requirements.

“The vision of Howard Entertainment is to offer a one-of-a-kind experience for students interested in all aspects of entertainment, from project greenlighting, to PR and marketing, to entertainment law and finance,” said President Wayne A. I. Frederick, M.D., MBA. “This relationship aligns with Howard’s strategic goals of enhancing academic excellence and inspiring new knowledge.

Collaborating with Amazon Studios will enable us to marry academia and industry efforts to build a robust workforce of diverse entertainment industry leaders. With Howard’s proven track record of developing some of Hollywood’s most notable actors, comedians and musicians, this next level collaboration will enable us to have even greater impact.”

Howard Entertainment

“Amazon Studios has been working to create new pathways into the industry for talented students of all backgrounds and we are proud to team with Howard on this new program supporting aspiring entertainment leaders” adds Jennifer Salke, Head of Amazon Studios.

“As we strive to delight our Prime Video customers, we’re ensuring there are diverse perspectives and experiences around the table to help us make the best decisions in all aspects of the business.”

Howard Entertainment

To qualify, students must be enrolled as a Howard University student, must be an upperclassman or graduate student and will have to complete an application and interview to be considered for the program.

Students will be taught by Howard faculty who will be supported by Amazon Studios employees and other industry professionals invited by Amazon. This will give students to work in projects that offer “real world” application and will help students develop “work ready” skills prior to graduating.

Source: Deadline

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Billionaire Robert Smith to pay off Morehouse Class of 2019’s student loans

Billionaire Robert F. Smith, who received an honorary doctorate at Morehouse College’s Sunday morning graduation exercises, had already announced a $1.5 million gift to the school.

But during his remarks in front of the nearly 400 graduating seniors, the billionaire technology investor and philanthropist surprised some by announcing that his family was providing a grant to eliminate the student debt of the entire Class of 2019.

“This is my class,” he said, “and I know my class will pay this forward.”

The announcement elicited the biggest cheers of the morning.

Tonga Releford, whose son Charles Releford III is a member of the Class of 2019, estimates that his student loans are right at about $70,000.

“I feel like it’s Mother’s Day all over again,” she said.

The gift has been estimated at $40 million.

 

Source and feature image: AJC

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Ancient Modern: Designer Hadiya Williams on Her Work and Inspiration

In 2018, we’re launching a new section: Aesthetics + Design. Our love of architecture, the arts and timeless design is married to our commitment to supporting the brilliant creatives that produce the work that adds value and beauty to our lives. Featuring architects, curators, artists, creators and makers, we’re excited to celebrate those most visually talented amongst us. Additionally, we’ll be sharing inspiration from homes and spaces that inspire.

For our inaugural feature, we sat down with Washington, D.C. based designer, Hadiya Williams, whose design has left in indelible mark on our lives, literally and figuratively. She was the mastermind behind our gorgeous wedding invitations for the #BlackestWeddingEver bka the ORIGINAL Jolloff and Jambalaya. (Believe it or not, some people actually stole our hashtag. Can you imagine?) But I digress.  She also recently completed a few larger scale projects in our Philadelphia home that was featured on HGTV’s Sneak Peek with AphroChic.

Check out what Hadiya had to say about her own personal aesthetic and process and look forward to more gorgeous inspiration to come.

Shantrelle P. Lewis

SB: Where are you from and how did you start working in design?

HW: I was born and raised in Washington, DC. I started designing while I was attending Bowie State University. I decided to take some computer graphics classes for an elective. I fell in love with the class and continued to teach myself how to use the design software. I eventually received by BFA in Graphic Design from Columbia College in Chicago.

SB: HBCU LOVE! And shout out to Columbia College. The Museum of Contemporary Photography(MoCP), on Columbia’s campus where Dandy Lion was on view in 2014, was one of the best things that ever happened to my career. Oh wait, you actually came to Chicago and saw the show there.

HW: I did! It was great to be back in the city. And of course, the exhibit was all of the things.

SB: Please describe what you do. How you self identify? As an artist? Designer? Creator?

HW: I would call myself all of the above. Depends on what I’m discussing or referring to. Ultimately, I am an artist. I know for a fact that what I do is art. I work intuitively most of the time. My work evokes emotion and very rooted in spirituality. Always has been.

SB: What inspired you to launch your 100 days of Black and white?

HW: I follow designer and book artist @eisroughdraft on IG. She shared a creative challenge, #The100DayProject with Elle Luna & The Great Discontent and I decided to do it. I was in a really tough space, creatively, at the time and thought the challenge would be a good way to help me focus and explore what I could do within that space. I had no idea how dramatic that release would be. I highly recommend a challenge like this where you do something for at least 21 days.

SB: What gave you gumption to start Black Pepper Paperie?

HW: #theblackestweddingever was the tipping point for me actually starting my business.  I did the invitation for this dope ass wedding which we all knew would be out of this world.

No one could have know just how amazing that experience would be. I came back from New Orleans in a completely different state of mind.

Before I left I was focused on working at my nonprofit gig and building up my position there. But I got back home and I knew I had to do work that I loved and that was exciting.

I began to plant the seeds for my stationery/event design business. Hence the “paperie” part of my name. I was pumped about that but there was still a part of it that I hadn’t figured out. I’m still learning and figuring out where this is going but it’s going definitely in the right direction.

SB: What are the most challenging and the most rewarding parts of owning your own business?

HW: The most challenging part about my business, so far is the learning. I have spent my career learning technical skills and design and being very focused with in the graphic design world.

Being an entrepreneur requires you to know so much more outside of art and design. That part is definitely challenging for me as a creative person. Like many artists, I just want to make shit.

The rewarding part, however, is the learning. Lol. Everyday I am faced with a new challenge. Creative and otherwise.

SB: Where do you pull inspiration? Who or what are your muses?

HW:  Black women. I am surrounded by an array of amazing, talented, dynamic women who guide me. They’re my muses. I’m also inspired by so many things around me. I have tons of design books, I go to vintage shops, thrift stores, outdoor markets, Pinterest.

I love West African art and design. It has always influenced my design thinking and the way I see.

SB: Tell me about your favorite personal/professional project?

HW: Ha! So, recently I painted designs on two walls in this home in Philly. Of course this is your home. That was something I hadn’t explored before and almost told myself that I wasn’t capable of. I consider it a favorite because it taught me that I have so much more work to do. And it reminded me that my work is spiritual.

I was inspired by the home itself and the history of the historically Black neighborhood, you and Tony’s roots in West African culture, and the open-minded spirit and boldness that you have.

Your curatorial work is bold and is all about taking risks. No one really thinks of home decor as risk-taking but it is the place where we are our most vulnerable and most comfortable. It says so much about who we are or at least it should. When people see our living space, if we are fortunate, it should tell them what we value most.

SB: Is there such a thing as a Black or African aesthetic?

HW: I think there is a thing that comes from Blackness that is innate, intuitive, not something that can be counted and measured. You know it when you see it and you actually feel the aesthetic, energetically.

I don’t think there is one specific aesthetic that is Black or African. I believe that we have a common aesthetic thread throughout the Diaspora.

The way we create music, dance, paint, and experience art in many forms, is connected. The evolved version of Black Americans is still connected to the Continent.

The same for the Caribbean. We all belong to each other. We consistently birth new art forms everyday. We are the cultural creators of the world.

SB: How would you describe your own personal aesthetic?

HW: Currently, my work is an amalgamation of West African cultural art, Black American cultural art and design, and early 20th century, western, abstract art and design that is essentially an appropriation or reinterpretation of West African art forms.

People who see my work tend to know or think they know it’s mine. So clearly I have an aesthetic, I have not found the words to describe it yet.

SB: What’s on your coffee table?

HW: A handmade vase from a fellow ceramics classmate, a book of matches, candle, my “genie bottle,” Dandy Lion by Shantrelle P. Lewis, Black Panther by Emory Douglas, Remix by AphroChic, The House Book, a Fire!! reprint, Black Society by Gerri Major, Taschen Publishing’s Logo Modernism.

SB: These days I’m becoming more and more selective about the kind of images I want to see in my social media fees. Who should we be following on IG? 

@BLKMKTVintage, @nicolecrowder, @justinablakeney, @andreapippins @ShoppeBlack, @nayyirahwaheed, @xnasozi, @tactilematter, @Afrominimalist @WalkieChatter, @ProfessionalBlackGirl and @Nachesnow. There are more but these are the first to come to mind.

SB: Lastly, what are tools that you can’t live without?

HW: My laptop.My cell phone (camera). #2 HB Pencils.

You can follow Hadiya on IG at @hadiyawilliams and @blackpepperpaperieco or visit blackpepperpaperie.com to inquire about projects, to purchase items and for more information.

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Howard University President Appointed to the Federal Reserve Bank Board

Howard University President Wayne A. I. Frederick has been elected to the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond’s Baltimore Branch.

The branch makes up the fifth district of 12 regional Reserve Banks. Frederick will be one of seven members elected to the branch’s board and will serve a three-year term that begins this month.

Howard University

“This is a great honor, and I’m excited to contribute my diverse business experience and knowledge to create economic and monetary policies to continue to stimulate growth and stability in our current banking system,” Frederick said.

Frederick will bring prior board experience, having served on the Board of Advisors for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), which was established to provide the president and secretary of education advisory support and program and strategy recommendations to strengthen HBCUs.

As the 17th president of Howard University, Frederick leads the federally chartered private HBCU, which has more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional students. Howard University is one of only 48 U.S. private, doctoral research universities.

Since Frederick assumed leadership of Howard University, he has remained committed to attracting the nation’s top students and generating more award recipients for national and international scholarships and fellowships. In 2016 alone, the university saw an increase in scholarship applications and recipients for the competitive Rhodes, Gates Cambridge, Marshall, and Schwarzman scholarships. This can be attributed to Frederick establishing the Office of the Honors and Scholar Development to provide shared resources for the university’s honors programs and honors societies and to offer assistance to students applying for these nationally competitive awards.

Under Frederick’s leadership, the university has also seen improvements in national college rankings. In fact, in 2017 the university jumped to 124 from a ranking of 142 in 2014 on the U.S. News and World Report Best Colleges Ranking of National Universities. Frederick has remained committed to improving alumni giving, which has increased to 10 percent in 2016 from nearly five percent in 2013.

“Dr. Frederick’s career accomplishments and experiences provide the kind of perspective the Federal Reserve values in its directors,” said Senior Vice President and Regional Executive Dave Beck of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Baltimore Branch.  “He’ll bring valuable insights about trends in healthcare and higher education, and provide a grassroots view into the D.C. metro area economy. We welcome him to the board of our Baltimore office and look forward to his service.”

Frederick’s leadership, healthcare and higher education contributions have been recognized by numerous organizations, and he has received several honors, including being named by the Washington Business Journal as one of the Power 100 of 2015 Innovators. He was named Male President of the Year by HBCU Digest in 2015 and also received the Minority Business Leader Award in 2015 from the Washington Business Journal, and a congressional citation for distinguished service presented by the Honorable Barbara Lee during Caribbean-American Heritage Month in April 2014.

The Richmond Federal Reserve Bank manages the nation’s money supply to keep inflation low, to help the economy grow and to supervise and regulate financial institutions. The regional district includes the District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and most of West Virginia.

 

Anthony D. Owens
Assistant Director, Media Relations
Howard University
anthony.owens@howard.edu
202-870-9208

Source: Howard University

 

Washington, DC – January 11, 2017 – (Newswire.com)

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22 Howard University Alumni Owned Businesses (Pt2)

We’re extremely proud and excited to present our second list of Howard University Alumni Owned Businesses! Be amazed. Be inspired. Support them.  Also be sure to check out our first list here!

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Howard University Alumni Owned Businesses

ANU is a Toronto-based producer of premium Shea butter products focused on naturally nourishing your skin. Founder: Kedar Waterman

Howard University Alumni Owned

DUAFE Designs offers hand-crafted, wearable art that empowers the mind, body, and spirit. Founder: Ayodele Kinchen

Howard University Alumni Owned

 

Non Profit HR is the country’s only human resources firm that works exclusively with the nonprofit sector with a focus in HR consulting, talent acquisition, executive search & HR. President & CEO: Lisa Brown Morton

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III Eye Digital partners with businesses and organizations to help them maximize their strategic online presence. Founder: Maya A. Gilliam

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Ellen Bee Productions provides professional wedding cinematography in the Washington DC, Maryland, and Virginia area. Owner: Lavon Surratt
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The Brown Services Group is a financial services firm that was founded with the goal of assisting their clients in every aspect of their financial lives. CEO: Jonathan Brown

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CanDid Art is a jewelry company for the fearless fashion enthusiast. They use a variety of metal and chains to create body chains, hand chains and earrings. Owner: Candice Cox

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NewME is a startup accelerator  focused on helping entrepreneurs identify strengths from their non-traditional backgrounds and leveraging them in business. Founder & CEO: Angela Benton

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Base Butter is an all natural, multipurpose beauty product formulated for use on your lips, body, or hair. Founder: She’neil Johnson

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MentorMe is a smart, intuitive mentorship platform that uses the power of the cloud to unlock potential inside organizations, companies and communities. Founder: Brit Fitzpatrick

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Shazzy Fitness is an easy to learn cardio exercise DVD series that fuses modern hip-hop dance with faith-based contemporary music, including Gospel Hip-Hop & Christian Rock. Founder and CEO: Kristy McCarley

Howard University Alumni Owned

FLO Brands is a lifestyle company created by Marcus Johnson, a Billboard Top 10, NAACP Image Award-nominated jazz musician and entrepreneur. FLO Brands’ products include FLO CD series, FLO Wine, FLO Fest and more.

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Corporate Alley Cat provides tools, strategies and experts to help professionals of color manage workplace challenges. This includes free blog, paid membership community, coaching, live events and training. Founder: Deborah Owens

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Sir and Madame offers casual & vintage-inspired clothing, accessories & shoes for women, men & kids. Co-founder: Autumn Merritt

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Suited Lifestyle was designed to create a network of young professionals and like-minded individuals who want to excel and achieve in various walks of life. Founders: Luke Anthony Lawal Jr. & James Trey Poindexter III

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YouHeardThatNew.Com is a hip hop focused blog that provides a colorful inside look to the music business and its inner workings. Owner: Nile Ivey

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The Vanity Group is composed of resourceful, creative and well-connected lifestyle management advisers who are experienced in Bespoke Event Producing, Luxury Concierge Services, and Talent Relations. Founder: Karleen Roy

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Lifestyle Equities is a strategic growth consultancy focusing on business expansion through content development, niche branding, strategic partnerships, and commercial real estate solutions. Founder: Jay Norris

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Popcorn Queens is a line of gourmet caramel popcorn created by a mother-daughter team who handcraft their gourmet caramel popcorn with the finest ingredients and lots of love. Owners: April & Bonnie Wardlaw

products-sizes1LegendaryMV is a Martha’s Vineyard inspired apparel company that offers a full collection of comfortable clothing. Founders: Jon and James

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Tutu’s Storybooks is a children’s bookshop with a mission to bring diverse books to community. They offer the newest high quality children’s Africana books and more. Owner: Maimunah Marah

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Emanus LLC provides patenting, innovation, commercialization, and licensing services to small and medium size enterprises, universities, start-ups, and government agencies. Founder: Wil Jacques

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To submit info for any other HU and/or HBCU owned businesses, hit us up at info@shoppeblack.US or submit via our website.

 

-Tony Oluwatoyin Lawson

 

 

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SpelHouse (Spelman & Morehouse) Alumni Owned Businesses

We’re back showing more HBCU entrepreneur love! This time to our brothers and sisters at SpelHouse aka Spelman College and Morehouse College. Check out a few of the business owners that these esteemed institutions have produced.

Spelhouse Alumni Owned Businesses

DCity Smokehouse The Washington Post dubbed it “the finest barbecue establishment in town.” Founder: Melvin Hines

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Mischo Beauty (Washington D.C.) is an Award-Winning Luxury, Eco-Conscious Cosmetics Brand. Founder: Kitiya Mischo King

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Oyin Handmade (Baltimore) is a fun-loving hair and body natural product line for men, women, and children. Co-Founder: Jamyla Bennu 

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Pindrop is an information security company that provides risk scoring for phone calls to detect fraud and authenticate callers. Co-Founder: Dr. Paul Judge

Perennial Strategy Group (Washington, D.C.) is a strategic advisory firm that provides government, public, community relations, and public affairs services. Founder: Lamell McMorris

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Onion Cut & Sewn (Harlem) features beautiful effortless clothes that feel like lotion. Founder: Whitney Mero

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Posh & Private (Houston) is a special event firm that offers event design, planning, and consulting for corporate and social events. Founders:  Husband and wife team Brandon Carson (Morehouse) and Brandi Carson (Spelman)

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Dental Kidz (Newark) is a full service pediatric dental & orthodontic practice. Serving infants, children, & special needs patients, they offer in-office sedation & hospital services. Co-Founder: Dr. Lezli Levene Harvell, D.M.D

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Florida Avenue Grill (Washington D.C.) is one of the Chocolate City’s oldest soul food spots New owner: Imar Hutchins

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Frederick Benjamin (New York) is a premium grooming line that fuses the power of natural ingredients with the art of science, all while honoring the elements of style. Founder: Michael James

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Bingham-Lester Dentistry (Maryland) offers preventive, restorative, and surgical care. Founder:Dr. Vickii Bingham-Lester DMD

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The Law Office of Council & Associates (Atlanta) is a law firm specializing in representing victims of automobile accidents, trucking accidents, daycare center neglect, and slips and falls. Founder: Lashonda Council Rogers

Joyful Delights Sweets (Atlanta) makes designs edible, cake pop favors as well as dessert tablescapes. Their customized and handmade cake pops ship nationwide and have been given as favors for birthdays, bridal showers, weddings, graduations, retirements, and corporate events. Founder: Joy Andrews

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Sanford Biggers (Harlem) creates art that integrates film, video, installation, sculpture, drawing, original music, and performance. Founder: Sanford Biggers

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Bovanti Cosmetics (Atlanta) is a diverse family owned cosmetics brand that “empowers women through and educational workshops, seminars, makeup classes, and beauty tours.”  Co-Founder: Anita Bohannon

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Source Booksellers (Detroit) is an independent bookstore that offers a unique niche of non-fiction books.  Founder: Janet Webster Jones

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Tony O. Lawson


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