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Personal Finance

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Different Ways to Invest in Black Owned Businesses

When it comes to supporting Black-owned businesses, some research is needed to discover which businesses are actually Black-owned.

Luckily, most public companies do not hide who is on their executive board, making the process easy with a little research. Once you have done some research on the businesses you wish to support, there are ways you can go about investing in them. If you have a desire to invest in Black-owned businesses, read on for a few ways to do so:

Take to the Stock Exchange

One of the easiest ways to support any publicly-owned business is to invest in the company on the stock exchange. Here are a few companies that have either a Black president or CEO, or have majority Black ownership that you can invest in:

  • Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc.
  • RLJ Lodging Trust
  • Urban One, Inc.

Invest in Companies That Financially Support Racial Justice

Supporting companies that have donated money to support racial justice can also be an option in the stock market. Several large companies have done so over the past few years, and supporting them can help them continue to do so. Choosing businesses such as these to get behind can help also grow your own money while showing your support for said business.

The Non-Stock Ways to Support Racial Justice

While taking to the stock exchange can be a great way to support Black-owned businesses and businesses that support racial justice, there are other methods available to investors as well, such as investing in startups or real estate crowdfunding.

You can join platforms such as The 10K Project, a community of everyday investors who actively fund Black-owned businesses.

You can invest in Buy the Block, another crowdfunding platform, for a minimum of $100. Many of the projects listed on Buy the Block are in historic Black neighborhoods or benefit a local community.

No matter what way you decide to invest, make certain you do your research. With investing in startups and real estate crowdfunding there is the risk of losing your entire investment, so it’s best to be careful.

Rethink Your Bank

Why not consider a Black-owned bank, especially if your current bank doesn’t meet all of your banking needs? Not only are you supporting a Black-owned company by using such a bank, but you can also ask them about any initiatives they have for the African American community to further your support.

Larger banks that are not Black-owned might also have community-focused initiatives as well, and it never hurts to ask, especially if you want to support such initiatives.

There are so many ways that you can support Black-owned businesses. Research the business you want to support, and think about how best you can support them, be it through purchasing stocks in the company or taking part in the company’s initiatives.

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8 Ways to Intelligently Invest $500

To ensure future financial stability, the best thing for you to do right now is to intelligently invest your money into profitable avenues.

Contrary to popular belief, you do not need to have thousands of dollars at your disposal to begin investing. With just $500, you can start investing and accumulating real, long-term wealth.

Keep reading to know how you can effectively invest your $500.

1.   Purchase a Certificate of Deposit

If you want to save for a short-term goal, certificates of deposit are a great way to invest your money. They’re safe to invest in as you get a guaranteed return on your investment, irrespective of the economy’s status. Interest paid on your certificate of deposit will be based on the initial deposit agreement you made and not market conditions.

2.   Start a Side Business

If your day job isn’t too demanding or you’d like to do something productive on the weekends, you could start a side business. Doing so will not only give you extra income but can also help you hone any other skills you have. You can buy items for cheap and flip them for profit, freelance as a content writer or graphic designer, sell second-hand goods on eBay or Craigslist, or open an e-commerce store.

3.   Pay Down Your Debt

With $500, you can pay down your debt and save thousands of dollars in interest. Getting rid of your debt as quickly as possible means that you won’t have to pay exorbitant interests to your creditors.

4.   Equity Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding refers to raising money from the public to finance a new business venture. In equity crowdfunding, public investors get a proportionate slice of equity in the business in exchange for their investment. Do some research and invest your $500 in a business that you think will provide lucrative returns.

5.   Set Up a Dividend Reinvestment Plan (DRIP)

Purchase dividend-paying stocks and invest them into buying more stocks. Over time, you will begin to accumulate more money through these reinvestments. Your stock can also increase in value over time and boost your overall net worth.

6.   Use Robo-Advisors

Robo-advisors are automated investing platforms that manage your investments. Many financial institutions let you invest through Robo-advisors. When you sign up for one, you will have to answer questions regarding your finances. Based on your answers, the platform creates an investment portfolio tailored to your needs. When you don’t have too much money, Robo-advisors are a great way to get started on investing.

7.   Contribute to a 401(k) or IRA

Contribute your $500 to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, like a 401(k). Make it your goal to maximize your employer’s match to accumulate more money. Talk to the HR personnel in your company to see if you can make a one-time deposit of $500.

You can also invest your money by opening a Roth IRA (Individual Retirement Account), a retirement savings plan that allows you to contribute after-tax money to your investment account.

8.   Buy Savings Bonds

If you’re a prudent investor, purchasing savings bonds is a great way to invest your $500. Bonds are low-risk investments, which means that the return on investment you receive from them will be lesser than your returns on stocks. Usually, you purchase a bond at face value and receive the principal amount plus interest at the time of its redemption.

Investing isn’t as confusing or overwhelming as it seems on the outside. It doesn’t always take too much time, effort, and money. If you still have misgivings about investing your money, talk to a financial expert and ask them for professional guidance.

 

***Important: Please do as much research as you can beforehand before making any investments.***

 

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6 Ways To Increase Your Income Using The Internet

A growing number of people are looking for ways to make more money online. Some of them are doing side gigs to make some extra money, while others are starting internet businesses that become their full-time occupation.

increase your income

Ways to increase your income online:

1. Affiliate Marketing

Affiliate marketing is a relatively easy and low-cost way to earn money online. You don’t have to have your own products or services to sell; affiliate marketing allows you to earn commissions from big corporations.

You advertise a company’s products or services on your website/blog or social media account, including links to the company’s offerings. Such affiliate tracking links ensure that you are credited for bringing a paying customer to the company’s website, and you are compensated with a percentage of the sale.

2. Online Freelancer Work

As a freelancer, you can offer skills-based services you are capable of providing remotely such as copy editing, graphic design, or IT support. If you can find enough gigs to support yourself, you can become a full-time freelancer. Alternatively, you can do occasional jobs to supplement the income from your main job.

3. Get Paid to Take Surveys

You can earn some money by taking online surveys, but don’t expect to roll in the cash. Survey sites rarely offer big payoffs, and most are more useful for earning gift cards than cash.  Swagbucks and Survey Junkie are two of the more popular survey sites.

4. Provide Online Courses

Online courses generate income once they’ve been created and are made available online. If you have a knack for teaching and a set of skills you’d like to share, consider creating online courses as a way to earn additional income.

It is important to know a particular subject area, but it is equally crucial to have the ability to engage students in your videos. If you are unable to keep their attention, they will not return for more classes.

5. Build Your Own E-Commerce Site

An e-commerce website is another way to earn money online, but it may require a bit more effort on your part. You would sell products from your website, either your own creations or those that are available commercially.

In the latter case, drop-shipping is the most popular and hassle-free method of fulfilling orders. You obtain the customers and take their orders, but a third-party stores and ships the products for you.

6. Publishing Online

Regardless of your current job, publishing nonfiction e-books is a great way to establish yourself as an authority in your field while also earning passive income. You don’t have to do anything after you’ve written and published the book to earn money from it.

Additionally, publishing your novel as an e-book—especially if it’s in a popular genre like romance, science fiction, fantasy, or mystery—has the potential to reach thousands of readers.

To make the most of these opportunities, you’ll have to stand out from the crowd and persuade customers that you’re the right person to work with or buy from.

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5 Money Myths That Could Be Preventing You From Building Wealth

They say money can’t buy you happiness—and to a certain extent, that’s true. But poverty doesn’t bring happiness either, does it?

Let’s face it, there are a ton of money myths out there parading around as truth. But the real truth is that most of these myths are keeping hardworking people broke!

The Internet can be filled with financial “tips” that are more myth than fact. You must validate financial tips you find on YouTube, TikTok, Instagram, Reddit, or Facebook by doing your own research and speaking to a professional.

But don’t worry, to get you started, we’ve compiled a list below to call out “truths” as myths.

1) I can start saving later.

Savings is only for the rich, right? Well, not if you want to stop living paycheck to paycheck. Nearly one-quarter of Americans fail to save money every month.

However, the key to saving is to save the right thing. The rate of inflation reduces the purchasing power of your money but also increases the value of your assets, such as real estate or stocks. Rather than saving for the sake of saving, invest your hard-earned cash in assets that will pay you and keep pace with inflation.

2) All debt is bad debt.

This is one of the biggest myths of all. Having an outstanding balance on your credit card or a high-interest loan can cost significantly more than the sum you originally borrowed. However, not all debt is the same.

It is possible to acquire “good debt”—debt with a low-interest rate that builds wealth over time. Good debt will provide future value, like a mortgage or student loans.

But you must avoid overextending yourself, even with good debt: It can become a problem if you cannot afford the payments. The amount of debt you have will play a significant role in determining your credit score, which is used by lenders to assess your credit risk. The higher the score, the better the terms, which saves you money on interest.

3) You’re throwing away money by renting.

A house can be a good investment as equity will be built over time. However, becoming a homeowner is not always financially feasible because it requires you to pay the mortgage, property taxes, homeowners insurance, maintenance, and repairs—not to mention the upfront costs of buying a home.

If you are only planning on living in an area for a few years, renting could make more sense financially. It can also be a great way to save a lot of cash if you live below your means.

4) Credit cards should be avoided.

Credit cards are convenient, but they can easily become a burden if you’re not careful. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have one.

As long as you pay off your card balance in full each month to avoid interest, making purchases with credit can be worthwhile. In addition to being a great way to redeem points for cash, travel, electronics, or investing, it can also help increase your credit score, making it easier to buy a car or house in the future, with a lower interest rate.

5) You’ll spend less money during retirement.

Many people make the mistake of assuming they have plenty of time to save for retirement. In reality, it approaches faster than you think. And for some, their retirement lifestyle could be even more expensive than their working years.

Retirement looks different for everyone. For some, it may be a time for leisure and traveling. For others, it offers the chance to pursue a second career they’ve always dreamed of. Maybe you just want to leave a legacy for future generations of your family. No matter what it is, you can do it!

 

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5 Signs That You’re Smart With Money

Since you most likely work hard for your money, it’s important that you are also smart with money in order to hold on to it and put it to work so that it helps you achieve your financial goals.

Here are some signs that you are smart with money.

You Have a Budget

If you are smart with money, you have a plan written down to decide how you will spend your money each month. You know that without a plan, you might run out of money before your next paycheck or before your next invoice is paid.

Over the long term, those who budget effectively will have manageable debt, room to indulge occasionally, and savings to pay irregular or unexpected expenses and retire comfortably.

You Keep Your Financial Goals in Mind

People who are smart with money have short-term, midterm, and long-term financial goals. These goals may range from paying off a credit card to retire by a certain age or saving enough to start a business. Whatever your goals are, if you’ve always got them in mind, it’s easier to ignore unnecessary expenses like impulse purchases that may take you off your path.

You Leverage Credit Wisely

There are many ways to leverage credit to create wealth. However, wealth creation via credit only occurs when the item purchased is an asset that puts money in your account on a regular basis, and continues to gain value that exceeds the interest you are paying on it.

You Avoid Unnecessary Fees

Although fees related to banking and financial services are almost impossible to avoid, there are some that you should never have to pay. Being smart with your money means understanding the financial products you are using.

With your bank, you avoid being charged unnecessary monthly fees and fees for insufficient funds or bounced payments. With your credit card, you avoid paying late fees. Even with services such as PayPal, you use the free “family and friends” option to avoid their transaction fee.

You Shop for Necessities with a Plan

Raise your hand if you have ever walked into a store for a few items and walked out with three times as much as you originally planned to get. I’ve been there too. Failing to plan means planning to fail. That’s why I now create a list beforehand and stick to it (most of the time).  Whether you are shopping for your home or your business,  it’s smart to do so with a list that has your budget in mind.

 

Tony O. Lawson


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5 Ways To Maximize Your Money with Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche

Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche is an award-winning teacher of financial education and is quickly becoming America’s favorite, personal financial educator.

The Budgetnista

In this interview, we discuss what business skills have helped her build multiple multi-million dollar businesses. We also discuss her new book, “Get Good with Money”, and what it means to be “financially whole.” Tiffany also shared the first five steps to achieving financial wholeness.

 

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Tony O. Lawson


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Who wants to be a Millionaire? 5 Questions about Black Wealth Accumulation

Ayesha Selden, also known as EldRich Cleaver, Millie Holiday, Fidel Cashflow, Cicely Titles, and Dr. Julius Earning is a real state investor, coach, mentor, and author of the book “Mud 2 Millions.”

She has garnered a large online following no doubt due to amongst other things, her no holds barred, tough medicine style of preaching her message of “owning sh*t”.

We caught up with her to find out her thoughts on the ways that wealth can be created within the Black community.

What does wealth mean to you?

Wealth is the freedom of not having to trade time for money. Wealth is having the cash flow from performing assets support a life you deem comfortable. Wealth is being able to drop everything on a Tuesday and go spend time with your mom on her birthday.

Has becoming wealthy always been a goal of yours?

I grew up in a poor neighborhood in South Philly during the crack era where the wealthiest people we saw were drug dealers. Not only did I aspire to have wealth, I always knew I’d get there (legally or otherwise lol).

As a kid, I wanted a briefcase more than I wanted dolls. I was entirely fascinated by tall buildings, offices, and movies like Wall Street. My mom used to drive us to Gladwyn, an affluent suburb of Philly, to show us how the wealthy lived.

In stark contrast to the row homes and blight I saw in our neighborhood, our drives to Gladwyn showed me castle looking houses with pool houses larger than the modest home we lived in.

It was important for my mom to show us that there was more out there than just our neighborhood. I am so grateful for those car rides because it let me imagine what was possible.

Ayesha Selden

You are very vocal on social media about all things ownership and wealth building. Why are you so passionate about this topic?

I believe that we are the only solution for our community. Help is not on the way. It is the responsibility of “self-made” black people who came out of poverty to then reach back and teach others how to do the same.

Group economics is our way out but, chile, Black flight is just as real as white flight. We “make it”, head for the hills and never look back at those we have left behind. We then fixate on changing the political landscape, as our solution, and forget how powerful we are as a people.

And it’s easier to look at “voting” as a solution because it doesn’t require us to go back to “the hood”. We get to wear “I Voted” buttons and feel good about ourselves. Every election cycle reminds me of The Great White Hope meets Ground Hog’s Day.

Same promises (from normally some old white guy) and not a damn thing changes. We rely on a government system that has shown us for centuries that it shouldn’t be trusted.

Millions of Black people lived in poverty before we had a Black president and millions of Black people continue to live in poverty after we had a Black president. The government is not the solution for poor people and it amazes me that we think this same system we don’t trust will radically implement public policy to redistribute the wealth.

If we want to see real change in our communities, building an economy that allows the Black dollar to circulate and flip in our community the same way it circulates in the Jewish or Asian communities is where we start.

We then lobby with our capital to get done what we need. We buy a voice in Washington which is the only thing this country understands. Until then, a large percentage of black people will stay in poverty, we will continue to be shot by the police and we will keep marching and singing.

What do you feel is the first step on the path to wealth accumulation?

Let me start by saying that Black people are not at fault for the current state of our wealth as a people. Hell, the fact that we have survived generations of trauma is a testament to our resilience. Our income, wealth, and asset ownership are fractions of white wealth.

Systemic racism and the effects of redlining, mass incarceration of black men, racist hiring policies, etc all have a huge impact on black wealth today. I read a study done by Pew Trust that says even in the year of our Lord 2020, in most states, Black and Hispanic communities are taxed at higher rates than comparable predominantly white communities.

We now know that our communities are paying higher property taxes but also continue to see that our resources (schools, roads, sanitation departments, etc) are inferior to predominantly white communities. We are also overpoliced with our own tax money.

I can point out a million ways the playing field isn’t leveled and has never been. But where do we go from here?

I choose to normalize Black wealth because I don’t believe there is a politician or political party that will change this. The path of wealth accumulation is exactly why I wrote my book Mud 2 Millions. It was my journey to a million by 30.

Ayesha Selden

It sounds cliche but our mindset and our relationship with money are the genesis of wealth creation. We need a collective focus on changing the narrative in our communities. We need middle class and wealthy Blacks to come back and show those left behind how to build businesses and assets.

We also need some self-reflection about our individual relationships with money. Most of us weren’t left a penny of generational wealth. Most of us weren’t taught a thing about how to manage money. Most of what we were taught about money was a lie.

We need to completely deconstruct most of what we know about capital and how we feel about money and reframe with a mindset of building.

Once I change my mindset, where should I start on my wealth journey?

Your net worth builder is in that sweet spot between your income and expenses. We call the amount of money left over after all of your expenses are paid, “discretionary income”.

If you find yourself living paycheck to paycheck, there are generally two ways to tackle this:

Drastically cut expenses or generate additional income through a side hustle after your 9-5 and/or weekends. I prefer a combination of boffum–curbing expenses and a side hustle because I’m trying to get the bag expeditiously.

 It’s important to look at where we are spending our money. Is it on things we need or are we overcompensating for being teased as kids for having trash sneakers?

In my book, I talk about a dozen or so side hustles to generate additional income (vending machines, real estate wholesaling, arbitrage online sales, trucking business, etc.).

If you can earn an extra $500 to $1,000/month in income, that could be all the difference in building wealth and leaving a legacy for generations.

Again, while where we are is not our fault, it is our responsibility to change the narrative for ourselves and future generations.

Why? Because no one else will. Peace.

Ayesha Selden
Ayesha Selden

Read the remaining wealth steps in Ayesha’s book, Mud 2 Millions.

Tony O. Lawson


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Tela Holcomb Retired At 29 After She Taught Herself How To Trade Stocks

From the outside looking in, you’d never know that Tela Holcomb has a net worth closely approaching the millions. She’s a happy mother and wife who lives below her means but made financial freedom a priority.

Not too long ago, Tela had a government job, worked a 9 to 5 and knew nothing about the stock world. But with diligence and practice, she was able to master her craft and earn over $1 million in four years from stocks and trading alone. With an industry like the stock market, it may take some time to get to terms with how it all works. But the more you know, the better it will be for you when you plan on making your first investment. It is definitely worth doing your research before making any moves.

And she’s here to help you do it too. In this interview with BAUCE, Tela shares what motivated her to get in stocks, the initial fears she overcame, and why she decided to build her own platform to help other women of color financially rise to the top as well.

Tela, I want to set the stage here. What was your 9-to-5 job before you got into stocks and trading?

Tela: So before I started trading, I was doing administrative work for the government. I was doing that for about seven years. What really made me want to start learning about stocks was this guy I worked with that was always talking about how he was going to retire early from trading on the stock market. He had this whole plan to RV the country and do all this crazy stuff. It made me curious.

I thought to myself if he can do it, I know I’m smart — I can figure this thing out. So that prompted me to just really start asking him questions because other than knowing the fact that the stock market existed and that there was a channel that talks about it all day, I didn’t really know anything else about it. And I didn’t have anyone growing up or around me at the time that I ever really talked to about trading outside of your 401k or investing. So that’s really what piqued my interest. I started asking him about what books to read, and what courses to take.

What resources helped you learn about the world of stocks when you were first starting out?

Tela: Honestly, it varied. A lot of the information goes completely over your head. So I had to Google a lot of stuff. I also went to Investopedia a lot and then I would also break things down for myself. Once I figured out what a term meant, I would find a way to figure out how it related to something I’m used to in everyday life so that it was easier to explain. Think about how you teach a child to tie a shoe.

You’re not telling them “rotate your strings 45 degrees and loop them around”. Instead, we say things like “the rabbit jumped over the log or make these bunny ears”. That’s how I truly mastered the stock game — by breaking through the lingo.

Did you have children when you started trading?

Tela: Yeah, I was a single mom at the time when I first started.

Having a side hustle while you have a job can be exhausting. How did you automate trading into your schedule? How did you find the time to learn all this information?

Tela Holcomb

Via Tela Holcomb

Tela: In the beginning, you have to allot time to it. I did it only because I was committed to having it replace my job. I was committed to having it generate income for me. But I didn’t want it to take all my time away from my family. What I did was find the time that I was already pretty much wasting — like all the time I was using to watch television — and reallocate it to learning about stocks.

So while I sat outside and watched my daughter play, I would be reading a book about the stock market. I would be looking at stock charts. When I was sitting at doctor’s appointments waiting to be seen, I would be scrolling through information about stocks on my phone. I chose to use the dead times in my day also to do more studying and more learning.

What was the first stock you ever purchased?

Tela: The first stock purchased was Coach [laughs] because I love purses. I was like, you know, what, if I can make the money to purchase the purse I want through the stock then I’ll get it. I will use it as a way to motivate me.

But when you purchased that first stock, did you know how soon you would get a return on it?

Tela: Uh, you know, at first I didn’t know. It was all practicing and that’s something I try to encourage people to do is use a practice account first before you use your real money. I lost money the first time around but I kept kind of trying to practice and figure it all out.

But then I started to learn that there are trends in stocks. There are some stocks that tend to [go through] the same type of movement, you could learn about these types of moments at sites about cannabis stock news. Maybe they always go up during a certain time of year or they always go down during a certain time of year. So once I discovered that I started to find the trends and all these different stocks. With Coach, I realized the stock always goes up around a certain time of year. So I knew I had a great chance of it going up because that was the trend of that stock.

What practice accounts do you recommend for people starting out?

Tela: There’s two practice accounts that I would definitely recommend. One is through Investopedia. They actually have a practice simulator on their website that people can use to kind of play around and get a feel of things. There’s also thinkorswim by TD Ameritrade. I love their practice platform. It’s a little techy for most people, but it’s definitely powerful and I highly recommend it.

The biggest mistake is trying to get out there with your real money when you have no idea what’s going on. I get people all the time that put their money out there and then they don’t even know how to sell it. Take the time to practice and learn this. The stock market’s not going anywhere. All this money is still going to be there to be made.

You talk about stocks as a path to financial freedom. Do you think stocks are for everyone?

Via TelaHolcomb.com

Tela: Yes. I believe everyone should have stocks as a part of their wealth building or their “legacy building”. Because we can’t pass down financial legacies if all we’re doing is saving and budgeting. So stocks, real estate, something of value — some type of investing needs to be a part of your wealth building plan so that you can start building a financial legacy within your family.

You have your own platform where you share these tips and jewels. What motivated you to start sharing these resources with other people, especially African Americans?

Tela: I decided to create my own platform to educate people and share my story because when I started there weren’t very many people trading stocks that looked like me. And so when I started that was a little discouraging for me. It also felt that no one was explaining it in a way that I needed to understand so all the information clicked. So I had to do that on my own.

I realized that there are more people out there that look just like me who probably are feeling the same way that I did when I started out. They may look around in the space and feel that they don’t think they have a chance to succeed in this. So it’s really for me to be out here and represent so that other black women (and men) can see what’s truly possible. As long as we are motivated and we take the time to put into the things we want — anything is possible.

 

Source: Bauce Mag


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Black Owned Venture Capital, Private Equity & Angel Investment Firms

Less than 1% of American venture capital backed founders are Black and the percentage of Black people in decision making roles within the venture capital arena is not much higher. This lack of diversity within investment firms ultimately translates to a lack of diversity in the companies that they invest in.

The good news is that there are a growing number of Black owned venture capital and other investment firms run by people of color who understand that Black founders present a large and untapped market.

These investors make it a point to include Black startups in their portfolio, and in some cases, focus solely on underrepresented entrepreneurs.

Black Owned Venture Capital, Private Equity & Angel Investment Firms

Collab Capital is an investment fund leveraging financial, human, and social capital to help founders build sustainable, technology enabled businesses

Collab Capital Managing partners Barry Givens,  Jewel Solomon Burks and Justin Dawkins

Black Star Fund is an angel/venture fund that focuses primarily on early-stage technology companies.

Serena Ventures focuses on early stage companies and giving them the opportunity to be heard.

GenNx360 Capital Partners is a private equity firm that focuses its investments in industrial and business services companies in the U.S. middle market.

Daphne Dufresne-Managing Partner – GenNx360

Authentic Ventures is a seed and early stage Venture Capital Firm that believes that a strong, inclusive network of founders, operators, and investors can accomplish great things.


Lindsay Lee, Founder & Managing Partner of Authentic Ventures

Impact America Fund is an investment company that funds market opportunities that use technology to enhance the lives of all Americans.

Kesha Cash – Founder and General Partner – Impact America Fund

645 Ventures is a seed to Series A VC firm that applies a data-intensive approach to investing in top software and Internet companies.

Nnamdi Okike, Co-Founder & General Partner – 645 Ventures

Backstage Capital is a venture capital fund that invests in new companies led by underrepresented founders in the U.S.

Arlan Hamilton –
Founder & Managing Partner – Backstage Capital

Harlem Capital Partners is a diversity focused venture capital fund that invests in early stage companies focused on tech-enabled services, retail, and real estate.

Harlem Capital co-founders, Henri Pierre-Jacques and Jarrid Tingle.

Precursor Ventures operates as an early-stage venture capital firm. The company invests in seed and early-stage consumer, digital health, education, Fintech, hardware, and SaaS companies.

black owned Venture Capital
Charles Hudson, Managing Partner and Founder of Precursor Ventures

KICVentures is an investment holding company that creates, invests and manages several portfolio companies in the health-tech sector.

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin — Managing Partner & CEO – KICVentures

Fairview Capital Partners is a leading venture capital and private equity investment management firm. They implement innovative fund of funds, co-investment, and customized investment strategies for institutional investors.

JoAnn H. Price – CO-FOUNDER / MANAGING PARTNER of Fairview Capital Partners

The Bronze Venture Fund makes and manages innovative investments that align strong financial returns with positive social impact.

Stephen DeBerry – founder and chief investment officer – The Bronze Venture Fund

DiverseCity Ventures (Sacramento, CA) invests in scalable, technology-enabled companies that have a social, economic, or environmental impact and high potential for outsized returns.

black owned Venture Capital
Mariah Lichtenstern, Founder and CEO -DiverseCity Ventures

Cross Culture Ventures  invests in and develops companies that fuel shifts in cultural trends and behaviors within an increasingly diverse global marketplace.

Marlon Nichols – Co-founder/ Managing Partner- Cross Culture Ventures

Vista Equity Partners is a private equity and venture capital firm focused on financing and forwarding software and technology-enabled startup businesses.

black owned Venture Capital
ROBERT F. SMITH, Founder & CEO of Vista Equity Partners

Base Ventures is a seed-stage fund investing in technology companies.

black owned Venture Capital
Erik Moore – Founder and Managing Partner – Base Ventures

Reinventure Capital is a growth-stage equity and debt investment practice focusing on founders of color and women.

Edward Dugger III –
founding partner and President – Reinventure Capital

Syncom Venture Partners is a leading venture capital firm primarily focused on growth stage investments in emerging and underserved segments of the media and communications industry.

black owned Venture Capital
Terry L. Jones, Managing Partner – Syncom Venture Partners

Cleo Capital is an early-stage venture capital fund that invests in pre-seed and seed stage tech and tech enabled investments. 

black owned venture capital
Sarah Kunst, Managing Director at Cleo Capital

CRE Venture Capital is a venture capital firm that invests in technology-enabled startup companies.

black owned venture capital
Pule Taukobong, Co-founder & Managing Partner at CRE Venture Capital

Plexo Capital is a hybrid venture capital (VC) firm investing both in emerging VC funds and in early stage companies.

black owned Venture Capital
Lo Toney, Managing Partner at Plexo Capital

Base 10 is an early-stage venture capital firm investing in the automation of the real economy.

black owned Venture Capital
Adeyemi Ajao, Co-Founder of Base 10

lllumen Capital is a venture capital firm that invests in early-stage and start up companies.

black owned Venture Capital
Daryn Dodson, Managing Director at Illumen Capital

 

Tony O. Lawson


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16 Black Personal Finance Educators & Experts

Confession: I’m lightweight obsessed with building generational wealth and making the best personal finance decisions.

And why not be obsessed about it? The financial security that I want to create for my children’s children’s children can’t be built on hopes and dreams. It’s gonna take serious planning and preparation.

Part of that planning and preparation involves seeking advice from experts like Peregrin Private Capital. But there are so many people offering to help you “get your money right”. Who do you choose? Who can you trust? Who you gonna call?

To make that decision easier for you we’ve put together a list of melanated money mavens. These financial freedom fighters will help you make smart decisions related to budgeting, saving, spending and investing.

We’ve listed the vets and O.G’s as well as the New Jacks and Millennials. Research them to see who’s advice, opinions and values align best with yours. You see where I said do your research, right? Ok, cool. That way you can never say Tony ruined your life 😉

Personal Finance Educators & Experts

Michelle Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post. Her award-winning column, “The Color of Money,” is carried in over 100 newspapers and finance blogs that provides insight into the world of personal finance. If you run a personal business, corporate finance consulting may be useful to you too!

Dr. Boyce D. Watkins is one of the leading financial scholars and social commentators in the country. He advocates for education, economic empowerment and social justice.

Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche is a best selling author, speaker and passionate teacher of fun, financial empowerment. Her company specializes in the delivery of financial literacy education.

personal finance

Jarim Person Lynn is the creator of Brass Knuckle Finance, a wealth building philosophy that promotes a cash based, no debt, high investment return way of life.

Carrie Pink, your “Financial Stylist”, is a lifestyle blogger, finance coach, and mom of five who teaches women how to blur the lines between frugal and fabulous so you can live an overall richer life.

Tonya Rapley is a nationally recognized millennial money expert. Her mission is to help millennials break the cycle of living paycheck to paycheck so that they can become financially free.

Malcom “MJ” Harris is the CEO of the National Care Financial Group, one of the largest Black owned financial services firms in the country.

Dr. Eric Patrick is the “Hip Hop Stock Doc” and the Founder and Chief Investment Educator of Black Market Exchange, LLC. He provides investment education so individuals may understand the stock market at its core enabling them to produce sound investment decisions.

After studying and mastering personal finance, Jalesa Ann paid off over $40,000 in debt, and began on the road to financial freedom. Now she uses her expertise to help other’s become moguls over their money through her company, “My Money Mogul

Marsha Barnes is the founder of The Finance Bar, a personal finance suite and mobile hub based in a retrofitted school bus. The Finance Bar aims to bridge the gap between individuals and financial wellness.

Kristin Sutton, LPC is empower young women to change the way that they think about money. She wants you to start budgeting like a BO$$

Clever Girl Finance is the creation of Bola Onada Sokunbi. She’s a Certified Financial Education Instructor (CFEI), money coach and all round finance junkie. She also saved $100,000 in 3.5 years.

Dominique Broadway is an award winning Financial Planner and the creator of Finances De•mys•ti•fied, an award winning organization that provides Personal Finance Coaching & Financial Capability solutions.

Kara Stevens is founder of the personal finance and lifestyle blog The Frugal Feminista , an online home dedicated to inspiring and informing women of color about financial empowerment, girl power, and “juicy” living.

Dominique Brown is a licensed financial advisor who helps individuals and small businesses overcome their financial roadblocks to financial freedom.

Kendra N. James is the Founder & CEO of The Finance Femme, a business financial consulting firm for women entrepreneurs. Helping entrepreneurs “manage money and control the chaos.”

-Tony Oluwatoyin Lawson