Black Business. Black Culture. Black Thought. Black Love.

Bobsled Team

Meet The Nigeria Women’s Boblsed Team Making History

in All Posts/Black Culture by

Nigeria has a Bobsled team! Yes, the very first African bobsled team is qualifying to compete at the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. The Houston-based trio is made up of Seun Adigun, Ngozi Onwumere and Akuoma Omeoga.

We caught up with them to discuss how they have already made history and are on track to do so again. This is what they had to say:

Seun Adigun

SB: How did you become interested in Bobsledding?

Seun: After retiring from the sport of track and field at the conclusion of the 2012 London Olympic Games, I decided in 2014 that I would seek an additional Olympic sport after watching the 2014 Winter Olympic Games.

I knew several track and field athletes who had transitioned into the sport of bobsled and figured I could start training in 2015 and try out for the USA Team.

After I made the team in August of 2015 I started to realize that my participation had grown to be much larger than me as an individual. I was representing a part of the sport that had never been shown before and it was time to give the sport of bobsled what it was looking to receive – the first Nigerian, and African Bobsled team.

SB: Describe your teammates personalities.

Seun: Ngozi is a fun-loving, dedicated and self driven woman. Her ability to set goals and then devise a strategic plan of action is a characteristic that cannot go unnoticed. She’s very passionate and aims for excellence in everything that she does.

Akuoma is filled with such a strong and bold personality, while her confidence and fearlessness navigate her on a sure path to success. Both of them are extremely genuine by nature and their level of selflessness creates endless opportunities.

SB: What are your individual goals for the Olympics and professional goals after?

Seun: My goal is to be the first African Bobsled team to compete in the Winter Olympics for the country of Nigeria and empower millions to follow their dreams along the way. After sports, I aspire to be a licensed Doctor of Chiropractic, as well as a Biomechanist and Exercise Physiologist for elite level athletes.

SB: What challenges do you face as the first African bobsledding team?

Seun: Making sure to pave the way and do it correctly so that others can easily follow the same path. Additionally, acquiring the necessary amount of funds to keep the team on a path to the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.

SB: Describe a regular training day or week. Is jollof rice still allowed during training?

Seun: 2-3 days a week of combination sled pushes with the “Maeflower” (our wooden sled); 2-3 days of strength and conditioning training, one day of active recovery, one rest day. Jollof rice is DEFINITELY still allowed!

SB: What message do you have for other athletes that aspire to reach the Olympics?

Seun: Recognize that the fear of the unknown is a real feeling, but impossible is nothing. It is okay to take risks in life and do things that are considered “uncharacteristic”.

Maintain a level of selflessness in the way that you handle day-to-day operations and you will surely reap the blessings in which you have sewn.

 

Ngozi Onwumere

SB: How did you become interested in Bobsledding?

Ngozi: I honestly needed a break from track and field after realizing I was done competing but knew I wasn’t quite ready to be done with athletics. I needed something new, fresh and exciting and bobsled brought that aspect and more.

SB: Describe each other’s personal characteristics?

Ngozi: I am pretty sure we would all describe one another as goofy. We can’t go one meeting without cracking multiple jokes of some sort but with a balance of motivation and seriousness.

Seun is definitely the stitch in the sense that she stays on top of everything and restores confidence in each of us. Akuoma is the sister and friend that literally understands all the words you are trying to say without you having to say them.

SB: What are your individual goals for the Olympics and professional goals after? 

Ngozi: My goal is to help build a legacy for Nigerian sports. After achieving this, the world is my playground.

SB: What challenges do you face as the first African bobsledding team?

Ngozi: Mainly financial obstacles. Also, learning curve in a short period and the doubt we get from some. All of which are completely normal for something this raw.

SB: Describe a regular training day or week. Is jollof rice still allowed during training?

Ngozi: Typically training day would be after the work day. Gathering our sleds and moving them to our practice area for   “two man pushes” and meet-like situation simulations; along with lots of footage for us to review. No jollof during training but we gladly indulge after!

SB: What message do you have for other athletes that aspire to reach the Olympics?

Ngozi: Keep going, keep pushing and be willing to give everything for what you want! You are one of million and one of a kind. Everyone has their strengths.

 


Akuoma Omeoga

SB: How did you become interested in Bobsledding?

Akuoma: I became interested in the sport the moment that Seun asked me, “What do you think about bobsleding?” I never thought too much about the sport prior to that day. She ended up putting together a presentation for Ngozi and I to see what the sport entailed. It was different, and typically different things strike my interest.

SB: What message do you have for other athletes that aspire to reach the Olympics?

Akuoma: Know that your goal is not unattainable. If you have set a goal for yourself, then you have deemed yourself fully capable. Believe in yourself and work smart.

 

 

The team launched a GoFundMe page last month and have raised over $12,000 so far. They still need our help so lets’s support them!

 

-Tony Oluwatoyin Lawson

Like and Share!

2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*

Latest from All Posts

Go to Top